Archive | March 2018

Common Sense and Respect for the Disabled Please

This is a rant, a rant about things disabled people hate, at least some disabled people. Not everything on the list will affect all disabled people and these are just what I have experienced and observed.

People who judge others for using disabled facilities such as toilets and parking spaces without knowing them. I used to have a disabled parking badge due to not being able to walk very far without getting tired or in pain, but I did not always use a walking aid. Sometimes people would stare at me as if to say, why have you got a badge when you can walk. I got the same look sometimes when I would come out of a disabled toilet. They did not know me or my situation and it was none of their business why I needed to use disabled facilities, but even a look can make you feel judged. I have heard stories of people getting notes left on their cars for parking in disabled spots being accused of using someone else’s badge when it was their own!

Bus drivers who refuse to let a disabled person on as it would mean them having to get up to get the ramp out or having to ask someone with a push chair to fold it and move seats. The space at the front of a bus is not for a pushchair, the signs clearly state it is a disabled space, yet some drivers do not seem to enforce this. Bus drivers who refuse a disabled person are discriminating against them. A recent court case that went all the way to the Supreme Court found in favor of the disabled claimant in that ‘the court said the company should consider further steps to persuade non-wheelchair users to move, without making it a legal duty to move them,’ (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38663322). So it is an ongoing battle with some drivers to get a space on a bus.

When a disabled toilet is used as a storage area or left out of order for a long time. Sometimes it feels like the disabled toilet is only there as a legal requirement and the company do not actually care if you can use it or not. For example a pub near me uses their disabled toilet to store things. You can still technically use the toilet, but the rails are blocked by things, and a lot of disabled people need the rails. My local supermarket has had an out of order disabled toilet for about a month now. Businesses are being short sighted when it comes to disabled toilets sometimes as it could lose them business. For example when I am on a night out with some of my friends, some of them are very disabled and we would choose to not go to a bar that we knew had bad disabled facilities. This would mean them losing out on not only the disabled persons custom but all their friends custom as well.

Shops that give little or no thought to disabled customers. Really heavy doors can be a  problem. When I was on crutches I used to use my body to push the door open, but with heavier doors this was tricky. For those with arthritic hands and wrists heavy doors can be impossible. Automatic doors are better for disabled customers, or at least a lighter door. Then once inside the shop the lack of space between rails or shelving can be an issue. Some clothing shops have over full rails that are too closely packed for a wheelchair user to get past. I used to knock things off sometimes in crutches if I was not careful. I have noticed that some shops have too much stock piled up on the floor between shelving units which can mean no space for a wheelchair or walking frame to turn around. Without the space to move disabled customers will shop elsewhere.

Poorly maintained pavements and walkways. Loose paving slabs and crumbling tarmac can be a trip hazard for anyone, but even more so for those with walking aids. I used to trip up on loose slabs when I was on crutches and this could hurt my hip quite a lot. People in wheelchairs can fall out of their chair if the wheels get caught up on loose slabs or in pot holes.

Dog waste and rubbish left on pavements and paths. It is unpleasant for anyone to have to smell and see, but for the disabled it can be very annoying. Dog waste can get on the wheels of someone’s chair and it can mean dragging it around. It is not always easy to see the ground right in front of your wheels to know to avoid it. Blind people also have obvious problems with dog waste since they cannot see it to walk around it. Rubbish can also be a problem since it can get caught up the wheels of a chair and then cause the chair to not move smoothly. I have noticed a significant increase in both dog waste and litter in the last few years and this shows a lack of respect for both other people and the environment.

People who park in front of drop down curbs on pavements or park on the pavement. A disabled person may not be able to cross the road without a drop down curb and may have to go an awful long way to find the next one, which could take them a long way out of where they want to be. There is a convince store in my town that people often park outside to pop in quickly, but they often park in front of the drop down curb. They often say they will not be very long, but what If the queue is long or they get distracted by something else? Parking on the pavement is just as bad as it means a disabled person may not be able to get passed. Often this means a disabled person will have to go back on themselves for ages and divert a long way round or simply not be able to get where they want to go. I have often had to walk into the road to get around a car and some disabled people simply cannot do that.

People who talk for you or to your companion about you when you are right next to them. This seems to happen especially to those in a wheelchair, it is as if because your legs do not work nor can your mind to talk properly. This is patronising and rude. When I was younger if this happened when I was with my parents I would just start talking anyway and join in showing them I was more than capable of talking for myself, in fact they might have more trouble getting me to be quite! Sure some people do have learning difficulties that come with a physical disability, but even then it still does not mean they cannot talk for themselves in most cases.

Poorly designed disabled toilets. Not all disabled people are in wheelchairs and want the sink low, in fact after my hip surgery I needed the sink not to be low as I could not bend far, but needed the rails and raised seat of a disabled toilet. Some disabled toilets are far too small for the needs of some disabled people who may need a carer to come in with them as well as space for a wheelchair or walker. A lot of disabled toilets also seem to lack a mirror which assumes disabled people do not care what they look like, which is wrong, disabled people are just as likely to want to check their make up or hair as everyone else.

People who say ‘you’re doing so well considering’ or call disabled people brave. They are very patronising things to say.  How do you know I am doing well? For all you know I am having a really bad day and on a good day you would not even notice I was disabled. How is it brave that I left the house and got on with my life? What am I supposed to do sit at home and rot? I cannot live my life not disabled so I just get on with it the best that I can.

Being accused of being a benefit scrounger. This is the big one that all disabled people hate. The media often make it seem like an awful lot more people are scamming the benefits system than actually are. The vast majority on benefits are on them legally with a good reason. Most people would not choose to be on benefits if they could help it. Having to prove yourself as ill and jump through the hoops they require to get them would put most cheats off. Being on benefits does not make me lazy or pathetic. You should never judge someone for being on benefits or any kind of welfare without knowing the full facts.

Disabled people are on the whole sensible and understand that sometimes some of these things cannot be helped under certain circumstances. What we ask for is to not let these things be issues when they do not have to be. A bit of common sense and respect is all disabled people want. Disabled people can be an active part of society, if society lets them.

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