OCD and how it is not funny if you really have it

OCD, I know I have talked about this before in other posts, but it recently became clear that I need to discuss it again and this time from another angle.

Yet another post about OCD on Facebook came up the other week.  ‘These three targets all look the same to people without OCD, click the link to find out how OCD you are’, or something along those lines.  I have OCD and the targets still looked all the same to me.  I commented on my friends post that this was the case and that I thought posts along these lines stereotype and trivialise my condition.  Another friend accused me of trying to start an argument when it was only a game.

I have seen too many posts along these lines about OCD being a perfectionist neat freak thing that can be judged by silly games.  I see memes and jokes posted around social media quite often that are starting to make it seem like OCD is some kind of joke condition.

OCD is now used as a phrase to describe neatness or fussiness. People often say ‘oh I am a little bit OCD’ but, as Connor Heapy wrote in the Independent newspaper ‘Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating condition characterized by unwanted intrusive thoughts and repetitive behaviors or mental acts. Although OCD is often associated with cleanliness and orderliness, it can manifest in a variety of ways. Some spend hours each day worrying about whether they have committed a paedophilic act while others are plagued by the thought that they may have caught HIV from their toothbrush, towel or phone’.  For me during a bad phase OCD can be a disability, stopping me from living my life a fully as I would like.

It is exhausting both mental and physically.  I get up and down over and over to get comfy sometimes and fiddle with my clothing or cushions or hair till I feel things are ‘just right’.  I have to listen to my own head nag me all day on my worst days.  I have had full on arguments with family members over OCD issues, and even argued with myself and the world around me at times.  I have been known to yell at inanimate objects at times.  It just spills out and I cannot help it.  You can learn to manage OCD up to a point, but it never fully goes away.  There is no full rest-bite from it.

For me OCD is about a feeling.  Getting things ‘just right’ does not always mean things have to be perfectly symmetrical or straight, sometimes I do not mind mess, but in my flat it is an organised mess.  My OCD also gets mixed up with my autism, so it is complicated.  OCD is not as simplistic as a lot of these social media posts make out.  My own head is full of mess so I like to be able to order and control the mess outside my head.

I never post jokes, memes or silly games on disabilities online and I ask other people to do the same.  Please respect my right not to have my disability made into a joke.  I can be a fun person and enjoy a laugh, but not at the expense of those already suffering.

downloadGawd, well I cannot tell any difference and I have OCD.

i-have-cdo  A very common meme I keep seeing

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One thought on “OCD and how it is not funny if you really have it

  1. that is as clear a description of OCD as I have ever heard and unfortunately some of it is familiar to me. And no, it is not amusing, it’s a dead weight to drag around

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