Archive | August 2017

OCD and how it is not funny if you really have it

OCD, I know I have talked about this before in other posts, but it recently became clear that I need to discuss it again and this time from another angle.

Yet another post about OCD on Facebook came up the other week.  ‘These three targets all look the same to people without OCD, click the link to find out how OCD you are’, or something along those lines.  I have OCD and the targets still looked all the same to me.  I commented on my friends post that this was the case and that I thought posts along these lines stereotype and trivialise my condition.  Another friend accused me of trying to start an argument when it was only a game.

I have seen too many posts along these lines about OCD being a perfectionist neat freak thing that can be judged by silly games.  I see memes and jokes posted around social media quite often that are starting to make it seem like OCD is some kind of joke condition.

OCD is now used as a phrase to describe neatness or fussiness. People often say ‘oh I am a little bit OCD’ but, as Connor Heapy wrote in the Independent newspaper ‘Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating condition characterized by unwanted intrusive thoughts and repetitive behaviors or mental acts. Although OCD is often associated with cleanliness and orderliness, it can manifest in a variety of ways. Some spend hours each day worrying about whether they have committed a paedophilic act while others are plagued by the thought that they may have caught HIV from their toothbrush, towel or phone’.  For me during a bad phase OCD can be a disability, stopping me from living my life a fully as I would like.

It is exhausting both mental and physically.  I get up and down over and over to get comfy sometimes and fiddle with my clothing or cushions or hair till I feel things are ‘just right’.  I have to listen to my own head nag me all day on my worst days.  I have had full on arguments with family members over OCD issues, and even argued with myself and the world around me at times.  I have been known to yell at inanimate objects at times.  It just spills out and I cannot help it.  You can learn to manage OCD up to a point, but it never fully goes away.  There is no full rest-bite from it.

For me OCD is about a feeling.  Getting things ‘just right’ does not always mean things have to be perfectly symmetrical or straight, sometimes I do not mind mess, but in my flat it is an organised mess.  My OCD also gets mixed up with my autism, so it is complicated.  OCD is not as simplistic as a lot of these social media posts make out.  My own head is full of mess so I like to be able to order and control the mess outside my head.

I never post jokes, memes or silly games on disabilities online and I ask other people to do the same.  Please respect my right not to have my disability made into a joke.  I can be a fun person and enjoy a laugh, but not at the expense of those already suffering.

downloadGawd, well I cannot tell any difference and I have OCD.

i-have-cdo  A very common meme I keep seeing

Communication

I communicate a lot with my family and friends electronically using text messages, social media and email. I know a lot of people communicate this way now, but it has been brought to my attention that I may do this more than most people my age. This post looks at why I like to use electronic communication so much.

hands-holding-mobile-devices-human-set-phones-electronic-communication-concept-vector-illustration-41976985

Practicality

My relatives live spread out across the country in many different counties. I also have friends that live a long way from me that I met at university. I find the internet a fantastic way to stay in touch with people at a distance. I send letters and cards by post, more than a lot of people do these days, but post takes time and often I want a much quicker response. Also the cost of postal services seems to be getting more and more expensive.

Staying in Touch

I would of lost contact with a lot of people if it was not for Facebook. This includes friends from university, people I met at various events and distant relatives. I have never had many friends and would like to keep the ones I have got. I also managed to get back in touch with a few friends from school that I had previously not spoken with in many years.

Generational

From about my age group and below it just seems to be the natural way people communicate. Although some do so less than others, it is common to use Facebook messenger to stay in touch with friends and even family. Text messaging seems to be becoming normal for people of all age groups now including my parents generation. I am a little bit too old to have had a mobile phone or the internet as a small child, but since I was about fourteen I have regularly used the internet to chat with friends. I got my first mobile phone when I was about sixteen when I decided it would be practical since I was at college and that is what everyone else was using. A lot of my university friends are three or four years younger than me and some of them seem to use electronic communications as much as I do. They grew up with it from a younger age so it is what they are used to. At university I actually would have missed out on things if I was not on Facebook. We would invite each other to parties and nights out using Facebook as it was a great way to invite a lot of people at once. We would use Facebook messenger to group chat as it was very handy for us as drama students to share ideas or work out rehearsal times for our practicals.

Autism Friendly

My autism sometimes makes face to face chat harder for me than it might be for some people. I struggle with eye contact; even my diagnostic report says that I do. When I talk I tend to get carried away and say too much or the wrong thing. When I have to write down what I want to say first either online or in a text message it means I can look back at it and have time to think about what I am saying. It means I am less likely to say the wrong thing and can cut out the waffle, get to the point better. It is common for autistic people to use the internet to chat; it has less social skills to learn, although there are some social rules and I by no means always get them right online. I do enjoy face to face chat, but it can be more tiring for me sometimes and often requires more effort, although this depends who I am talking to and on the situation. Face to face people use non-verbal communication such as body language which can be tricky for autistics to pick up on. There is less hidden meaning in written text chat. I feel like I am more in control with this way of chatting. I do not have to talk to someone when I am not in the mood. If I am having a bad day mentally I can chose to ignore a text message or email and deal with it later when I am more able to. This way I do not upset people and take my bad moods out on them. I do use the phone, but have never been totally comfortable with it. Once I start chatting on the phone I often relax and am fine, but the initial thought of it sometimes makes me anxious. So text messaging is often easier for me. (Although I am getting better with making phone calls and do makes calls when I need to.) Another thing I like about written communication is the more definite response rather than ‘hmm’ or a nod of the head that I can often misunderstand. Even an OK or emoticon is at least a response that shows they took on board what I was saying. I find there is less pressure and less hassle with this way of communicating.

Can Just Say It

I like how I can say what I need to whilst I think of it with electronic communication. If I am not sure if someone is free to chat at the time I can still text or email for them to read later before I forget what I was going to say. Plus sometimes I have to say stuff as I get anxious if I do not. I worry if I do not say certain things as soon as I can to people. I do not mind if people read it later as long as I know it is out there.

Writing is my Skill

Writing is something I am quite good at and I feel confident at it. When talking in person it sometimes gets misunderstood. When I write I seem better at putting at my point across.

How Others Want to Communicate

It often seems to be how others want to communicate with me. Maybe they find it easier as I can bore people with my over talking in person. Also I have no land line phone and calling a mobile phone can be costly so maybe texting or emailing is just cheaper for people. I have relatives who email me rather than phone. I think this could be as they do not know when I am free to talk and do not want to disturb me if busy. I Facebook with some relatives responding to statues and comments as it seems a good way to communicate with each other when we do not actually know each other very well in person. This way I am getting to know them without so much pressure. I text with some family since they are often busy and they do not have time to see me face to face or phone very often.

This way of communicating does come with its own problems. When I do not want to talk I can chose not to, but in turn others can do the same to me. If people ignore me for short periods I am fine, but if it goes on for long periods it can worry me. The trouble is these days people are often expected to be instantly available 24 hours a day when it is not always possible. Another problem is of course when technology lets us down. What with lack of phone signal or devices breaking down or running out of charge sometimes old fashioned post or face to face is just easier.

I do not mind which way people choose to communicate with me, be it face to face or electronically. It is just nice when people want to chat with me.